The Efficacy of Motivational Interviewing: A Meta-Analysis of Controlled Clinical Trials

The Efficacy of Motivational Interviewing: A Meta-Analysis of Controlled Clinical Trials

Title: The Efficacy of Motivational Interviewing: A Meta-Analysis of Controlled Clinical Trials

Authors: Brian L. Burke, Hal Arkowitz, and Marissa Menchola

Published In: Journal of Counseling and Clinical Pyschology, Volume 71, Issue 5 (2003), Pages 843-861

Abstract:

A meta-analysis was conducted on controlled clinical trials investigating adaptations of motivational
interviewing (AMIs), a promising approach to treating problem behaviors. AMIs were equivalent to other
active treatments and yielded moderate effects (from .25 to .57) compared with no treatment and/or
placebo for problems involving alcohol, drugs, and diet and exercise. Results did not support the efficacy
of AMIs for smoking or HIV-risk behaviors. AMIs showed clinical impact, with 51% improvement rates,
a 56% reduction in client drinking, and moderate effect sizes on social impact measures (d = 0.47).
Potential moderators (comparative dose, AMI format, and problem area) were identified using both
homogeneity analyses and exploratory multiple regression. Results are compared with other review
results and suggestions for future research are offered.

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Burke et al.

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