A Meta-Analysis of Motivational Interviewing: Twenty-Five Years of Empirical Studies

Title: A Meta-Analysis of Motivational Interviewing: Twenty-Five Years of Empirical Studies

Authors: Brad W. Lundahl, Chelsea Kunz, Cynthia Brownell, Derrik Tollefson and Brian L. Burke

Published InResearch on Social Work Practice, Volume 20, Issue 2 (2010), Pages 137-160

Abstract:

Objective:

The authors investigated the unique contribution motivational interviewing (MI) has on counseling outcomes
and how MI compares with other interventions.

Method:

A total of 119 studies were subjected to a meta-analysis. Targeted outcomes included substance use (tobacco, alcohol, drugs, marijuana), health-related behaviors (diet, exercise, safe sex), gambling, and engagement in treatment variables.

Results:

Judged against weak comparison groups, MI produced statistically significant, durable results in the small effect range (average g ¼ 0.28). Judged against specific treatments, MI produced nonsignificant results (average g ¼ 0.09). MI was robust across many moderators, although feedback (Motivational Enhancement Therapy [MET]), delivery time, manualization, delivery mode (group vs. individual), and ethnicity moderated outcomes. Conclusions: MI contributes to counseling efforts, and results are influenced by participant and delivery factors.

Link to the Article (IU Subscription): This link leads to the .pdf (Adobe Acrobat) file and will work only if you are logged in to IU.

Lundahl et al., 2010

You must be logged in to post a comment.